What Matters During Car Accident Insurance Settlement Negotiations

It’s important to protect your insurance recovery by taking key actions after a collisionCar insurance is mandatory in Kentucky. Insurance is supposed to protect you from the financial consequences of a car crash. Yet, while the purpose of insurance is to protect you the goal of the insurance companies is to minimize the amount of money that they pay out in insurance settlements. That is how insurance companies maximize their profits, but it unfortunately happens at the expense of personal injury victims. If an insurance company that is contractually obligated to provide you with a fair settlement instead pays you too little to compensate you for your medical expenses, lost income, and other costs then you will be left with the bills.

Accordingly, it is important to know what you can say and what you can do to protect your own insurance settlement after a car crash injury.

What You Say Matters

Every conversation that you have with the insurance company is important. Anything that you say can be misconstrued and later used against you during settlement negotiations.

However, after a crash it is important for you to call the insurance company to report the accident. During this call you should inform the insurance company of…

  • The date and time of the collision.
  • The location of the crash.
  • The cars involved and the name, contact information, and insurance information of the other drivers involved in the collision.
  • Your name, address, and phone number.
  • The name, address and phone number of your attorney.

You do not have to provide the insurance company with your theory about why the accident happened, you do not have to share any evidence you may have, and you do not need to discuss your injuries. That said, you should not lie and say that you feel fine when you do not, or that there were no accident witnesses when there were witnesses. Instead, you should refer all questions to your attorney.

Additionally, you should not agree to provide a recorded statement. Even the smallest detail may be used against you later.

What You Do Matters

Just as your words matter after a car crash, so too do your actions. You can help protect your recovery by…

  • Gathering as much information as possible about your accident. This evidence may be collected at the scene of the accident and afterward. It may include photos, medical records, witness statements, and other important information.
  • Contacting your insurance company promptly to report the accident. Your insurance contract may require you to do so within a certain amount of time.
  • Reading your insurance policy and reviewing it with your attorney. You want to understand what your rights may include.
  • Refusing to agree to an independent medical exam or to provide your medical records to the insurance company without speaking with your attorney first.

Your actions can help protect your recovery, but you don’t have to handle your recovery alone or wonder whether you are making a mistake that could impact your recovery.

Your Attorney Matters

You have the right to be represented by counsel. Your lawyer understands the tactics and tricks of insurance adjusters and will make sure that your fair recovery is protected.

While the insurance adjuster works for the best interests of the insurance company, your attorney will work to protect your best interests and to negotiate a fair settlement that compensates you for your past and future medical expenses, lost income, out-of-pocket costs, and pain and suffering.

You shouldn’t have to spend any money to hire a lawyer right after a car crash. Instead, your lawyer should be paid a percentage of your recovery. Thus, you have nothing to lose—and much to potentially gain—by scheduling a free consultation with a local personal injury lawyer. If you would like to set up a meeting and to have an attorney answer your insurance adjuster’s calls and requests, then we encourage you to contact us directly via this website or by phone to set up your meeting.