After your baby was taken to the NICU, you may be wondering if there was something that could have been done to prevent his injury. But in cases of meconium aspiration syndrome, it may not be the parents who are liable for their baby’s suffering.

 

Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) occurs when an infant breathes in amniotic fluid and waste products from the womb. The condition is usually related to fetal stress, causing the baby to react by taking his first breaths before he is fully delivered.

 

MAS is more likely to occur in the following situations:

 

  • Difficult deliveries – Babies may be in breech position, have a prolonged delivery, or suffer an injury during the birthing process that causes him to inhale sharply.
  • Overdue babies – MAS is more likely to occur in children who are overdue than those who are born pre-term. In some cases, a doctor may miscalculate a baby’s date of conception, resulting in a baby being born overdue without the mother or father suspecting he has spent too many weeks in the womb.
  • Maternal conditions – Mothers who suffer from certain health issues, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic respiratory issues or cardiovascular disease are considered high-risk for MAS.
  • Growth complications – Babies who have not developed properly while in the uterus or who have suffered umbilical cord problems may be more likely to aspirate fluids during the later weeks of pregnancy.

Has Your Family Been Impacted By A Birth Injury?

If your family has been impacted by a birth injury you need to speak with an experienced birth injury attorney as soon as possible. Contact us online or call our office directly at 888.450.4456 to schedule a free consultation.

Mark K. Gray
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Louisville attorney serving the seriously injured in Kentucky
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