What Does it Take to Distract a Kentucky Doctor and Cause Injury?

Matthew L. White
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Founder & Partner of Louisville Personal Injury Law Firm Gray & White Law

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1/30/2013
Matthew L. White
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The results of a new study led by researchers at Michigan State University found that it could take as little as three seconds of interruption to distract someone into making an error. The study, which was funded by the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research, is believed to be the first study of its kind to consider brief interruptions of difficult tasks and the effect of such an interruption on the outcome of a specific task. The study results were published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.

Researchers have expressed surprise at the study’s findings. 

They report that they did not expect short interruptions to have a significant effect on a person’s error rate. However, they found that the amount of time that it takes to silence a cell phone, look at a pager, or take a few seconds to attend to something else can be critical for emergency room doctors and their patients, as well as others who perform work that takes considerable thought and those who depend on them.

Call a Kentucky Medical Malpractice Attorney if You’ve Been Hurt

If your doctor has been distracted by any kind of interruption and failed to provide you with reasonable care that has resulted in a physical injury, then you may be entitled to medical malpractice relief. For more information about your rights and possible recovery, we encourage you to contact an experienced Louisville medical malpractice lawyer today via this website or by calling us directly at 800.634.8767 or 502.210.8942.



Category: Medical Malpractice

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